Presentation: SCMLA 2015

“Enduring Silence: The Impossible Sound of Stolen and Sacred Names in Fantasy Fiction”

I've been digging back through old work and 
came across this recording that I forgot I had. 
I LOVE the two books it's analyzing
(Tigana is one of my top favorites of all time)
and I miss working with straight up fantasy. 
Maybe I need to get back to that a bit 
now that the dissertation is done. 
This was back when I was but a young Ph.D. candidate 
and had just passed my comps the semester before. 
I'm pretty sure I murder half of the names and place names
and words from the authors' invented languages. 
It sounds like I know exactly what I'm pronouncing
but that just wasn't the case 
and I feel terrible for whatever
injustice I did to these authors' imagine worlds. 

From the introduction:

In Guy Gavriel Kay’s Tigana, a conquering sorcerer strips the country of Tigana of its name in retribution for its Prince killing his son. In Jacqueline Carey’s Kushiel’s Avatar, Phèdre searches for and then holds within her the vast complexity of God’s name, needed to save her oldest friend. One name stolen, the other sacred, both are lost throughout the majority of these texts to a silence that defines characters and drives plot. Even at their climaxes, when these silences break and these names are once again heard, both texts strain under the impossibility of representing an unrepresentable sound: all the stories, the tragedies, the meanings these singular names have come to hold.

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All Too / Not At All

alienclassroom

 “And yet when essays draw on the work of Barad or Haraway but do not attend to nonhuman life, environments and material agencies, the lack is notable. Feminist materialisms, especially in their posthuman forms, are worlds apart from the conventional classroom, an all too-human place cordoned off from more-than-human liveliness. The chasm between the two suggests how intrepid and inventive we must be to teach with a (posthumanist) feminist materialism”

–Stacy Alaimo / “Book Review: Teaching with Feminist Materialisms” (179)

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